All posts by Louth SPCA

Artists for Animals

We are delighted to be hosting a great night of music to raise much needed funds to help animals in our care, on Friday 15th November at 8pm in The Lisdoo, Newry Road, Dundalk.

It’s a night not to be missed with three amazing musical performances from Zoe Conway & John McIntyre, Jim Corr & Liam Monagher and the Oriel Traditional Orchestra. MC on the night is Dundalk personality Mr Harry Lee.

There will be a raffle with lots of great prizes. Finger food will be provided. For those with a pep in your step, DJ Karl Collins from Dundalk FM will provide tunes till late!

Tickets are €20 available from

  • Avenue Vets
  • The Pet Centre, Linenhall St
  • Prize Pets, Riverlane, Dundalk

Also available at the door on the night. Doors open at 7.30pm.

Should I adopt a dog?

Among companion animals, dogs are unmatched in their devotion, loyalty and friendship to humankind. Anyone who has ever loved a dog can attest to its hundred-fold return. The excitement your dog shows when you come home, the wagging tail at the sound of the leash being taken from its hook, the delight in the tossing of a tennis ball, and the head nestled in your lap-those are only some of the rewards of being a dog owner.

Owning a dog is not just a privilege-it’s a responsibility. These animals depend on us for, at minimum, food and shelter, and deserve much more. If you are considering taking a dog into your life, you need to think seriously about the commitment that dog ownership entails. If you already have a dog, you need to consider if you are fulfilling all your obligations as its owner.

Consider the following carefully – Are You Really Ready To Get A Dog?

  • Have you done homework, such as reading about housebreaking, training, behavioral problems, and daily care of a dog? And what kinds of dogs are best for you and your family?
  • Will your working hours allow enough time to provide the care and exercise a dog needs every day?
  • If you have children, will you have time to provide the daily care and exercise a dog needs every day?
  • Will you have enough money to cover food, toys, annual vet exams, vaccinations, monthly heartworm preventative, flea control, unexpected medical costs, grooming, training, and boarding the pet when you travel?
  • Are you ready to live with a pet? Can you depend on your children not to pester a dog and let a dog out the door? Will you be able to watch the dog at all times when children visit your home?
  • If considering a puppy, will you be able to arrange for midday visits — since puppies need to go out every 4 hours or so to become housebroken?
  • Do you have time for obedience training and teaching house manners as necessary to help the dog become a good companion?
  • Do you travel frequently, and if so, what are your plans for the dog?
  • If you move, can you be sure your next place will allow dogs?
  • Can you make the commitment to care for this animal for his or her lifetime?

Tortoiseshell Kitty

Tortoiseshell kitty, is just one a a few cats in the last week found all over the place. Avenue Road Vets in Dundalk have a few in there if interested in homing a cat. We would love to find them all new homes!

If you already have a cat, PLEASE get them neutered!

Apply For Homing

Day-time contact number.
An email we can reach you at. Does not have to yours, but you need access to it.
Type the name of the animal from the above description.
Please help us out by describing where you live, family members, and why you feel your home will be ideal. We WILL carry out a home inspection if you are chosen.
Please consent to your data being stored by us for future use internal to the society.
You're going to need to prove that!
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Max

German Shepherd x Labrador, 1 year old, young man. Is to be neutered this week. Has lived in a house with other dog. Would need bit of training but is a happy lad. Will make a great pet for right family.

Apply For Homing

Day-time contact number.
An email we can reach you at. Does not have to yours, but you need access to it.
Type the name of the animal from the above description.
Please help us out by describing where you live, family members, and why you feel your home will be ideal. We WILL carry out a home inspection if you are chosen.
Please consent to your data being stored by us for future use internal to the society.
You're going to need to prove that!
reCAPTCHA is required.

Coco

Coco is a Pomeranian, he is a house dog and has lived in an adult household. He is only 1 year old and is to be neutered this week. Busy wee lad, likes to run about, would need owner that has time to give and a bit of training.

Apply For Homing

Day-time contact number.
An email we can reach you at. Does not have to yours, but you need access to it.
Type the name of the animal from the above description.
Please help us out by describing where you live, family members, and why you feel your home will be ideal. We WILL carry out a home inspection if you are chosen.
Please consent to your data being stored by us for future use internal to the society.
You're going to need to prove that!
reCAPTCHA is required.

Yorkies

We have two little Yorkies looking for new homes. A male 3 year old who is neutered, a lovely boy. We also have a female 5 year old who needs to be neutered.

They are looking for a new home together or separately. Both are house trained. They would suit a quieter home, so no young children.

Apply For Homing

Day-time contact number.
An email we can reach you at. Does not have to yours, but you need access to it.
Type the name of the animal from the above description.
Please help us out by describing where you live, family members, and why you feel your home will be ideal. We WILL carry out a home inspection if you are chosen.
Please consent to your data being stored by us for future use internal to the society.
You're going to need to prove that!
reCAPTCHA is required.

Diabetes in Dogs

Diabetes is a disease that means the body is unable to properly regulate its glucose metabolism.  Glucose is typically metabolized by insulin, a hormone created in the pancreas.

There are two types of diabetes, insulin resistance (Type 2 Diabetes, which is more common in cats, and the inability to create insulin (Type 1 Diabetes) which is most common in dogs.  Type 1 diabetes is caused by the inability to create enough insulin.

In Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas becomes damaged by either inflammation, or the dog’s own immune system attacking it. The result is a shortage of insulin producing cells in the organ, which is irreversible.  Consequently, diabetic dogs are very unlikely to go into remission.

Signs of Diabetes in Dogs

The most common symptoms of diabetes in dogs is increased thirst and urination. This is caused by the glucose becoming too concentrated in the dogs bloodstream. Drinking more water helps to dilute the glucose. However, there are other medical conditions that can also cause your dog to drink more than usual, such as kidney or liver disease or Cushing’s Disease. Your vet will run some tests to check for diabetes; they will look for higher than normal levels of glucose in his blood and urine.

Treatment

In both types of diabetes, the treatment is to supplement that insulin with injections of the hormone. The first step is to work out how much insulin your dog needs. Your dog will be admitted to hospital and given a measured dose, and then his blood will be checked at regular intervals to assess his response. When the amount of insulin he needs has been calculated, you can then continue to treat him at home. It’s not difficult to learn how to give insulin injections, and the needles are so fine that your dog will barely notice them.

It’s important that your dog’s energy needs are kept constant. This means that the are given the same amount of exercise, because more or less than usual will affect how much insulin they need. Similarly, their food intake should also be the same from day to day, both in quantity and the timing of their meals. If you can do this, then it will be easier to keep their blood glucose within normal limits.

Overweight dogs should be put on a restricted calorie diet, as weight loss can make it easier to regulate blood glucose. The hormone progesterone can raise blood glucose levels and make it difficult to stabilise a diabetic dog, so entire females should be spayed. There are a number of prescription dog foods that can help with this process if your veterinarian recommends them.

Most diabetic dogs will develop cataracts in their eyes, and this will affect their vision. However with a few adaptations, they can still have a good quality of life.

Diabetic Emergencies

There are two emergency situations that can occur in your diabetic dog.

  • Hypoglycemia. This occurs when his blood sugar drops too low, either because he has been given too much insulin or he hasn’t eaten all of his food. Symptoms are trembling and weakness, and some dogs even have seizures. Emergency treatment is to rub some glucose syrup or honey on his gums, which will quickly increase his blood glucose. Most dogs quickly recover after this, but it’s still worth having them checked by your vet.
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis. Insufficient insulin will lead to your dog metabolising his body fat to provide energy. The by-products of this metabolism are chemicals called ketone bodies. They have a distinctive odour, like nail polish remover. Affected dogs are lethargic, vomiting and off their food. Diabetic ketoacidosis often occurs before your dog is diagnosed with diabetes, because their pancreas isn’t producing enough insulin, but it can also happen if his diabetes isn’t well managed and his insulin dose is too low. This is a real emergency and your dog needs urgent veterinary treatment.

There is no cure for diabetes in dogs. However, with a committed owner, the disease can be managed well. This will allow your canine best friend to enjoy most of his normal daily activities.

How to Keep Your Dog (And Other Pets) Cool

As we all know, one of the most life-threatening mistakes people can make is to leave a dog in a vehicle during hot weather. Dogs can’t perspire, as humans do, to cool themselves off via evaporation, so they have to pant to cool themselves. If the air that they are taking in is too hot (as it is in a parked car in hot weather), then panting has little cooling effect and the dog quickly overheats.

Many people think their dog will be OK if they leave the windows open, but even with the windows wide open, the car can quickly become hot enough to cause heatstroke, brain damage, and even death. Your pet may pay dearly for even a few minutes spent in a sweltering car.  Please leave your pets at home during hot weather (and not outside, but inside with a fan and plenty of water).

Heat stroke in dogs

Signs of heat stroke include heavy panting that does not resolve as the pet rests, increasing distress, a tongue color that is dark red to almost purple, weakness or collapse, hyper-salivation, vomiting and labored breathing. If you suspect a dog or cat is suffering from heat stroke, move him to a cooler environment immediately and apply cool water to the abdomen, ears and foot pads. Don’t pour ice water over the whole animal, submerge him in a tub of cold water or cover him in a cold, wet blanket. Once he is stable, get him to a vet as quickly as possible, even if he seems to be cooling down and his temperature seems normal. Things may be happening on the inside that are not obvious from the outside.

Walking a dog in hot weather

If you walk your dog on lead, keep in mind that asphalt can get very hot during the summer. In fact, it can get hot enough to burn a dog’s pads, causing him pain for days. You might want to do only short walks early in the morning or later in the evening, when the temperatures are lower. Before taking your dog for a walk, check the ground for hotness with one of your own hands or bare feet. If you can’t keep your hand (or foot) on the ground for more than three seconds, it’s probably too hot to walk your furry friend. Dogs who are older or overweight, have a thick coat or have a pushed-in nose (such as bulldogs, Boston terriers and pugs) are especially at risk of overheating. On walks, bring water for both you and your pet, or a collapsible bowl if there’s a water source on your route.

Provide water for a dog at all times

Providing water for your dog is always important, but it’s especially critical during hot weather. If your dog is inside during the day, make sure you supply fresh, cool water that remains in a shaded spot throughout the day, since sun coming through a window can heat a bowl of water. Most dogs won’t drink hot water no matter how thirsty they are.

If your dog stays outside during the day, make sure his water bowl isn’t in a place where he will tip it over. Water bowls can be tipped over by dogs trying to make a cool spot to lie down. If necessary, buy a tip-proof water bowl. Also, make sure he has a shady place where he can get relief from the sun. Kiddie pools are a nice way to give dogs their own clean puddle in which to play.

Cats

Cats, of course, also need plenty of cool water during hot weather. White cats can become sunburned if they lay in the sun too long. Even if they’re indoor cats, they can get sunburned through a sunny window.

Rabbits

Rabbits can also be adversely affected by extremes of temperature. To control the temperature of their environment and to keep them safe from predators, rabbits should be kept inside. The temperature inside their houses should not drop below 15 or go above 23 degrees. Heat stroke can occur in a rabbit at 26 degrees.


A little empathy goes a long way in protecting our pets from extreme weather. Basically, if it’s too hot for us to stay comfortable in the car, in the yard or on a walk, it’s even HOTTER for our furry friends. Use your common sense, and don’t kill your pet with stupidity!

Chip’s Progress

So Chip “the almost blind dog” has found a brilliant new home.

Thanks to the generosity of his new Mum and Dad for offering him a forever home. They have done their homework to make life as easy for him as possible (evidently, basil put at different points will stop him bumping into things).

He is managing great. It just warms the heart to see a dog like Chip faring so well!