All posts by Louth SPCA

A Message from our Chairperson

Oliver Morgan, the PRO for Louth SPCA and committee member for past number of years, has decided to resign as of today. We would like to thank him for all his endeavours and support of the Society, especially in securing our Patron Brian Gartlan. On behalf of the Directors and Committee, I would like to wish him all the best for the future.

Paul Casey

Chairperson of Louth SPCA

Blanket Donations

We received a donation of blankets from Aer Lingus. They had made a statement of giving to Rescues and Welfare round the country and we at Louth SPCA were lucky enough to get a bag full.

Thank you to Aer Lingus!

Patch

Patch, he is about 2 years old, has been passed from pillar to post. Last person only had him two weeks before surrendering him to us. He is great, loves to be loved. Plays ball and loves his walks.

He will need bit of training but is so willing to please. He is lovely wee boy.

Apply For Homing

Day-time contact number.
An email we can reach you at. Does not have to yours, but you need access to it.
Type the name of the animal from the above description.
Please help us out by describing where you live, family members, and why you feel your home will be ideal. We WILL carry out a home inspection if you are chosen.
Please consent to your data being stored by us for future use internal to the society.
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Bobby

Bobby, this wee man found himself in the pound for Christmas, but in the New Year came to us, he was found as a stray.

He is about a year or just over. He loves human contact and is very good at learning what to do. He would need someone with time to give TLC and train him.

Loves his walks. He has been with another dog.

Apply For Homing

Day-time contact number.
An email we can reach you at. Does not have to yours, but you need access to it.
Type the name of the animal from the above description.
Please help us out by describing where you live, family members, and why you feel your home will be ideal. We WILL carry out a home inspection if you are chosen.
Please consent to your data being stored by us for future use internal to the society.
You're going to need to prove that!
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Bobbie

Bobbie, 6 years old. He is house trained and loves children, well
older would be preferable. Through no fault of his he has to
find a new home. He will be castrated before going.

Apply For Homing

Day-time contact number.
An email we can reach you at. Does not have to yours, but you need access to it.
Type the name of the animal from the above description.
Please help us out by describing where you live, family members, and why you feel your home will be ideal. We WILL carry out a home inspection if you are chosen.
Please consent to your data being stored by us for future use internal to the society.
You're going to need to prove that!
reCAPTCHA is required.

How to Help the Animals Impacted by the Australian Wildfires

As destructive wildfires continue to rage across Southern Australia, conservationists and wildlife experts fear for the survival of various animals. Half a billion animals are feared to have perished since the fires first started in September, leaving many native Australian fauna under threat of extinction – including the beloved koalas (as many as 95% percent of them could be gone). While the deadly bushfires rage on, opportunities to donate to the animals impacted by the Australian fires are in abundance, and we’ve gathered them below as many of you have asked.

This image is not a photo, it is a representation of all the fire damage in the last 3 months.

While trees burn, various wildlife are impacted, raising concerns for extinction. For instance, the future of koalas has long since been in question, but now with the bushfires tearing through Australia’s “Koala Triangle” (a region where in the majority of the nation’s koalas on the Australian east coast live), the threat of extinction is even more immense. Before the fires, the area’s koala population was expected to become extinct in as little as 30 years. Now, this timeline has been potentially accelerated.

Aside from the threat of extinction, the loss of habitats, food sources and the struggle to rehabilitate numerous injured animals are also major concerns. Here’s how we can help the wildlife victims of these fires during this devastating time.

Donate to the World Wildlife Fund

Donations to the the World Wildlife Fund will go towards supporting the injured animals impacted by the fires, particularly the koalas. You can donate to the WWF here.

Donate to WIRES

Wildlife rescue nonprofit Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service (WIRES) is rescuing and caring for thousands of injured, orphaned, and homeless native animals. You can donate to WIRES here.

Donate to the Port Macquarie Koala Hospital

Donations to the Port Macquarie Koala Hospital will go towards installing automatic drinking stations for wildlife searching for water in Australia’s burnt areas. Donations will also support the establishment of a wild koala breeding program, designed with the hopes of reversing the species’s threat of extinction. Donate to the Port Macquarie Koala Hospital’s GoFundMe page here.

Donate to the RSPCA of New South Wales

The RSPCA of New South Wales is working to evacuate, rescue and treat pets, livestock and wildlife in impacted areas. Make a donation to the RSPCA of New South Wales here.

Please also share this post with as many of your social media friends as possible, using the below buttons.

Pets and Christmas Food

A lot of the lovely food you feast on over the Christmas period can be very harmful to our faithful companions. Watch out for the following favourites that are most definitely NOT for your furry friend!

Chocolate

All kinds of chocolate and cocoa-based products – including chocolate tree decorations and chocolate advent calendars – should be kept away from pets because chocolate contains a stimulant called theobromine. Theobromine is toxic to dogs and cats: it can lead to a racing heartbeat, dehydration, digestive upsets, seizures and in severe cases DEATH. The darker the chocolate, the more harmful it is. Make sure any presents you leave under the tree do not contain chocolate if you have a dog.

If you feel you really want your pooch to join in the Christmas fun, there is such a thing as chocolate suitable for dogs, which contains zero theobromine. It’s this or nothing for Fido.

Christmas Cake

Never share fruit cake, mince pies or Christmas pudding with your pet, no matter how much they beg, because raisins and currants are highly toxic to cats and dogs, even when cooked. Dried fruit poisoning can cause diarrhoea and vomiting and, in very serious cases, could lead to kidney failure!

Fizzy Drinks

Apart from being full of sugar or artificial sweetener – both of which are very bad for your pet – many fizzy drinks also contain caffeine, which has a similar effect to the theobromine in chocolate. Rapid breathing, restlessness and a racing heartbeat are the potential symptoms of serious caffeine poisoning.

Nuts and Crisps

Salty snacks are a festive staple, but they’re bad for your pet in many ways. Peanuts and crisps contain too much salt and fat, and macadamia nuts are highly toxic: they can cause sickness, a high temperature, tremors and heart palpitations. The effects of macadamia nut poisoning can happen very quickly, so keep all nuts well out of reach.

Sugar-free sweets and Chewing Gum

These days, the sweetener xylitol is often used to replace sugar in sweets, cakes and chewing gum. Too much xylitol has a laxative effect on humans, but the consequences for your pet are much more serious. An excess of Xylitol can spark a sudden surge of the hormone insulin which, in turn, can cause seizures, vomiting, lack of co-ordination and potential liver damage.

Cheese

Keep festive cheeseboards away from hungry pets because dogs and cats can often struggle to digest the lactose in dairy products. Too much cheese can give your pet a tummy upset.


If you think your pet has eaten something potentially poisonous during the festive season, always contact your vet immediately.

So what CAN your pet eat at Christmas… aside from his own food, that is?

Christmas Turkey

The pièce de résistance of every Christmas dinner, your furry friend can enjoy small quantities of your turkey as long as all pieces are boneless, skinless and free from gravy or other marinades which can upset your pet’s stomach.

Potatoes

A super tasty side dish, again only feed your pet potatoes in small quantities – as they are starchy – and ensure they are plain with nothing else added, such as butter and salt.

Winter Vegetables

Carrots, parsnips, green beans, courgettes, brussels sprouts, broccoli, peas, spinach and cauliflower not only make yummy Christmas dinner trimmings but all great for your pet. Make sure you rinse off any excess butter or oil before giving to your furry friend and always feed in small quantities.

Christmas comes early for Louth SPCA!

Funding of €55,000 was recently awarded to local animal welfare organisations. The biggest beneficiary was the Louth SPCA who will receive €23,000 🙂

Drogheda Animal Rescue will also receive €20,000 while Dundalk Dog Rescue has received €12,000 in the funding announced by Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine Michael Creed today.

The news has been welcomed by local Fine Gael TD Fergus O’Dowd who confirmed the payments would be made with immediate effect.

He said: “This funding will contribute to the protection of surrendered, abandoned and at-risk animals. Drogheda Animal Rescue (DAR), Louth SPCA and Dundalk Dog Rescue all do great work here in the county and I am thrilled to see this recognised and funding made available to help this excellent work to continue.

“The staff and volunteers who work in these organisations do outstanding work and I would like to take this opportunity to recognise their contribution.”

We are incredibly excited by this news and thank all involved. It will certainly take off some of the pressure over Christmas, out busiest period each year by far.

Dealing With A Barking Dog

While the Louth SPCA would ideally like to think that every dog is happy in his environment, we all know that many are not. This unhappiness often manifests itself as excessive barking. Unfortunately if this dog is being regularly fed and has shelter (kennel for instance), our hands are tied as we only deal with neglect and abuse. This is a matter for your local council (however, do let us know if you believe the dog is without food and/or shelter).

Section 25 of the Control of Dogs Act 1986 deals with nuisance by barking dogs. If you don’t get a satisfactory response from the dog owner, you may complain to the District Court, using the form prescribed under the Control of Dogs Act. You can download a copy of this form from here.

The court may make an order requiring the occupier of the premises in which the dog is kept to abate the nuisance by exercising due control over a dog. The court may limit the number of dogs that can be kept on a premises or may direct that a dog be delivered to a dog warden to be dealt with as unwanted.

Read further information about control of dogs in general.

Dogs also bark due to behaviour problems or training problems, The biggest mistake people make when it comes to stopping your dog from barking is using punishment-based tactics or things like bark collars, sprays, shock, or pronged collars – they never work and are cruel to your canine companion. Instead you may well need to consult a professional dog trainer to help get to the root of things. It is very likely they can help get your dog’s barking under control!