All posts by Louth SPCA

Rocky

Rocky is a Terrier crossed with a Chihuahua, he is 2 years old. He came in with Sandy but is more out going then her. He loves to go for walks and is learning to play. He has been in a home situation but didn’t get much attention. He will be castrated vaccinated and chipped.

Lovely wee man, loves cuddles.

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Sheba

Husky, she is 2 years old and just loves to play and has made friends with the Rottweiler that we have. She is small in stature. She has been neutered, vaccinated and chipped. She has been a family dog and lived mostly outside.

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Boots

Boots is a staffie cross, just coming to 1 year old. He has been with us for approx  6 months now. He is great with all dogs goes out playing with them all. He is castrated and vaccinated and chipped.

Now he is quite scared at first, until he knows you. We have been working with him to get him to go on walks but he feels safer in the kennels.

So if a new owner wanted him they will have to work with him to get him to go for walks, the world is a big scary place!

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Sandy

Sandy is a wirehaired terrier, she is about 3-4 years old, a lovely wee girl. Quiet, has not had best of homes previously,
so she needs a home where she will get plenty of TLC. She loves a cuddle, likes walks and has been around other dogs.

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Type the name of the animal from the above description.
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What to do if you find a baby wild animal

Many wild animals are born during the spring and summer months. In your own back garden, you may come across baby rabbits, squirrels, deer, and other young wildlife as they make they make their way into the world.

For many people, the pleasure of seeing these young creatures is mixed with a sense of protectiveness—of wanting to help them survive. But spotting a baby animal by himself doesn’t necessarily mean he’s an orphan. Many wildlife parents leave their young alone during the day, sometimes for long periods. The mother is usually nearby and quite conscious of her young. Also, keep in mind that despite their small size, many young animals are actually independent enough to fend for themselves.

  • a wild animal presented to you by a cat or dog
  • bleeding
  • an apparent or obvious broken limb
  • shivering
  • evidence of a dead parent nearby

Wild animals can suffer greatly through being handled and this should be avoided unless absolutely necessary.


Injured or Sick?

If the baby has any one of the following signs, he or she is probably sick or injured and in need of assistance:

  • bleeding or wounded
  • seen in a cat’s or dog’s mouth, or if there is a likelihood that the animal was picked up by a cat or dog
  • wet and/or shivering
  • hit by a car, lawnmower, boat, or other vehicle
  • limping
  • a drooping wing (But if both wings appear to be “drooping” by the same amount, it could be normal—it depends on the species)

Some young animals appear injured when they’re not. If the animal has none of the above signs, he may be healthy.

Is the Animal Really an Orphan?

The Louth SPCA often receives phone calls about orphan animals that aren’t really orphaned at all. Many young animals may appear to be orphaned, but actually may be doing just fine on their own. Determining whether or not an animal is an orphan depends on the animal’s age and species, and how you may perceive their natural behaviors. Here’s more information on the young of species you may encounter, to help you decide whether or not they need to be rescued.

Baby Foxes

Often fox kits will appear unsupervised for long periods of time while their parents are out hunting for food. Observe the kits from a distance; if they seem energetic and healthy, just leave them alone. Only contact a wildlife rehabilitator if the kits appear sickly or weak, or if you have reason to believe both parents are dead.

Baby Rabbits

If you find a nest of baby rabbits and the nest is intact and the babies uninjured, leave them alone. Mother rabbits only visit their young 2-3 times a day to avoid attracting predators.

If the rabbit nest has been disturbed, or if you think the babies are orphaned, recover the nest with surrounding natural materials such as grass and leaves.

  • Put an “X” of sticks or yarn over the nest to assess if the mother is returning to nurse her young.
  • If the “X” is moved but the nest is still covered by the next day, the mother has returned to nurse the babies.
  • If the “X” remains undisturbed for 24 hours, contact a wildlife rehabilitator near you.

Keep all pets out of the area, as they will surely find and kill the young rabbits. Also, try not to touch the babies, as mother rabbits are very sensitive to foreign smells and may abandon their young. A rabbit who is four inches long with open eyes and erect ears is independent from his mother and able to fend for himself.


Baby Squirrels

If tree work was recently done and the nest or baby fell down as a result, give the mother squirrel a chance to reclaim her young.

If the baby is uninjured, leave him where he is, then leave the area and keep people and pets away. Monitor from a safe distance.

If the baby is not retrieved by sundown, contact a local wildlife rehabilitator. If it’s chilly outside, or the baby isn’t fully furred, place him in a shallow box with something warm underneath (like a heating pad on a low setting or a hot water bottle) so he doesn’t get cold and compromised while waiting for his mother to return. Do not cover the squirrel with leaves or blankets, as the mother may not be able to find him.

Note: A squirrel who is nearly full sized, has a full and fluffy tail and is able to run, jump, and climb is independent.

Baby Deer

If you come across a young deer, remember they are also very resilient in the wild but very difficult to rehabilitate once removed from their natural habitat – they often die from stress. People often mistakenly assume that a baby deer, called a fawn, is orphaned if found alone. Rest assured that the mother deer, the doe, is probably nearby. The doe will only visit and nurse her fawn a few times a day to avoid attracting predators. Roe deer give birth in May and June and fallow deer mostly have their young in June. Fawns can walk within an hour of being born. Unless you know the mother is dead, leave the fawn alone.

Mother deer are wary of human smells; if you have already handled the fawn, take a towel, rub it in the grass, and then wipe down the fawn to remove all human scent. Then return the fawn to the place where you found him.

If the fawn is lying on his side, or wandering and crying incessantly, he may be orphaned. If this is the case, call a wildlife rehabilitator in your area. But remember: a fawn found alone and quiet is okay.

If a wild animal exhibits any of the above signs, you should immediately call one of the following local resources for assistance. You will find listings for most of these in your telephone directory, or try an online search.

  • Local animal shelter
  • Animal control agency

Capture and Transport

Once you’ve contacted the right person, describe the animal and his physical condition as accurately as possible. Any wild animal can be dangerous, so take safety precautions, even with small babies. Unless directed otherwise, here’s how you can make an animal more comfortable for transport or while you’re waiting for help to arrive:

  • Prepare a cardboard box big enough to hold the baby. A shoe box works well for most song birds and small baby mammals, but some animals might need a larger box.
  • Line the box with an old t-shirt or soft cloth and poke holes in the sides before you put the animal in the box.
  • Wear gardening gloves if you are handling a small bird and leather gloves if you are handling a larger bird or a mammal.
  • For most animals, it is best to use a towel to cover the animal and then gently scoop her into the box and close the lid securely. But if the animal is a baby mammal larger than a small rodent (squirrel), it is best not handle her at all. Instead, use the box itself to scoop her up.
  • Do not give the animal food or water. He could choke, develop digestive problems, or drown. Many injured animals are in shock, and eating or drinking can make it worse. It is far more important to keep the baby warm and safe than to feed him immediately. If the rehabilitator is unable to arrive soon, he or she will instruct you on what else to do, if anything.
  • Place the container in a warm, dark, quiet place—away from pets, children, and noise—until you can transport the animal.
  • Transport the animal as soon as possible. While in the car, keep the carrier out of the sun and away from direct air conditioning or heat. Keep the car radio off and talking to a minimum.

Don’t Leave Dogs and Cats Outside in the Cold

You may have noticed the weather around the county has gotten bitterly cold, with temperatures dipping as low as minus 3 last night.  Naturally, you would keep yourself safe from this kind of cold, so make sure to do the same for your dogs, cats and other pets/animals!

First and foremost, DO NOT leave your dog outside in freezing cold temperatures. Dogs have been rescued or found dead in yards tied to trees or other stationary objects in icy and snowy elements. One of the most devastating things to come upon is a dog, or another animal, that has been tethered in the backyard during a winter freeze and to learn that the dog has actually frozen to the ground only to die from exposure. Being tied up and helpless to save yourself would be terrifying. Just think how our trusting pets feel when they are left in this state and unable to seek shelter, all while quickly succumbing to freezing temperatures.

Buy your dog a coat. This may sound silly to some people, but not all dogs have thick hair and older dogs feel the cold in their bones the way humans do when out walking. You can but a nice, warm, waterproof coat for your dog at any pet store or even online for less than 20 euro.

Dog CoatWhether house cat or outdoor cat, they need to be brought and kept indoors during cold weather. Scared and cold cats can get themselves into dangerous situations like getting stuck in pipes they have crawled into for warmth or hiding under car hoods on a warm engine.

As with hot weather, DO NOT leave pets in cold cars. Your car can quickly turn into an icebox, and result in their death.

Apply common sense in all cases – if conditions are undesirable for you, then they are undesirable or even dangerous to THEM. Your pet relies in you to keep them safe, make sure you do just that this winter.

Leo

Leo is a Jack Russell, he is only 5 months approx. So loving and just a pup. He is very good with other dogs and people too. As a puppy will need training. He will need exercise and plenty of TLC.

Apply For Homing

Day-time contact number.
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Type the name of the animal from the above description.
Please help us out by describing where you live, family members, and why you feel your home will be ideal. We WILL carry out a home inspection if you are chosen.
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Mischa

Guess who’s back? Mischa, a chihuahua terrier cross, is 16 months old now and has been with us two nearly three months (she went to a home for a brief time, but proved too bouncy for the lady). She originally came to us with puppies but they have all been homed.

Mischa was a family dog, but allowed to roam too. She is lovely and will need a family able to teach her some manners and exercise her regularly – she has boundless energy! She is chipped, neutered and vaccinated. Mischa also loves to give cuddles and sit with you. She gets on well with other dogs.

Apply For Homing

Day-time contact number.
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Type the name of the animal from the above description.
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What should I do before adopting an animal?

Any existing pets and your new arrival should be vaccinated for rabies, distemper, parvo, and other common diseases, as recommended by your vet. The bordatella (kennel cough) vaccine may also be recommended for dogs. There is a good chance that your new pet could be harboring a disease, and it isn’t wise to unnecessarily risk your other pets’ health. It would be ideal to keep incoming animals separate from your own pets for a period of time if you have the space to do so (and this is a must if you are introducing a dog that haven’t been fully vetted), but this isn’t always realistic since the animal will be living in your home as a member of the family.

In the case of dogs, make sure you have a well-fitted collar and ID tag. Remember that this dog doesn’t know you yet and might get spooked and run. Take all possible precautions. Better safe than sorry!

You will have to treat the new arrival like a puppy (or kitten!) at first. Puppy proof the house before he arrives. If he is young or has not been raised in a house, he might be destructive and not housetrained. You should set up a crate for him with bedding that can be easily cleaned or thrown away if soiled or chewed (like old towels).

If you choose not to use a crate, you should have a small, pet-safe room (like a laundry room) for when you cannot watch them. If you use an outdoor kennel for unsupervised time, make sure it is very secure (a cover or top is recommended) and be sure to provide appropriate shelter, shade, bedding, and clean water. Please also remember that cats like to be outside more than inside.