Category Archives: Other

A Message from our Chairperson

Oliver Morgan, the PRO for Louth SPCA and committee member for past number of years, has decided to resign as of today. We would like to thank him for all his endeavours and support of the Society, especially in securing our Patron Brian Gartlan. On behalf of the Directors and Committee, I would like to wish him all the best for the future.

Paul Casey

Chairperson of Louth SPCA

How to Help the Animals Impacted by the Australian Wildfires

As destructive wildfires continue to rage across Southern Australia, conservationists and wildlife experts fear for the survival of various animals. Half a billion animals are feared to have perished since the fires first started in September, leaving many native Australian fauna under threat of extinction – including the beloved koalas (as many as 95% percent of them could be gone). While the deadly bushfires rage on, opportunities to donate to the animals impacted by the Australian fires are in abundance, and we’ve gathered them below as many of you have asked.

This image is not a photo, it is a representation of all the fire damage in the last 3 months.

While trees burn, various wildlife are impacted, raising concerns for extinction. For instance, the future of koalas has long since been in question, but now with the bushfires tearing through Australia’s “Koala Triangle” (a region where in the majority of the nation’s koalas on the Australian east coast live), the threat of extinction is even more immense. Before the fires, the area’s koala population was expected to become extinct in as little as 30 years. Now, this timeline has been potentially accelerated.

Aside from the threat of extinction, the loss of habitats, food sources and the struggle to rehabilitate numerous injured animals are also major concerns. Here’s how we can help the wildlife victims of these fires during this devastating time.

Donate to the World Wildlife Fund

Donations to the the World Wildlife Fund will go towards supporting the injured animals impacted by the fires, particularly the koalas. You can donate to the WWF here.

Donate to WIRES

Wildlife rescue nonprofit Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service (WIRES) is rescuing and caring for thousands of injured, orphaned, and homeless native animals. You can donate to WIRES here.

Donate to the Port Macquarie Koala Hospital

Donations to the Port Macquarie Koala Hospital will go towards installing automatic drinking stations for wildlife searching for water in Australia’s burnt areas. Donations will also support the establishment of a wild koala breeding program, designed with the hopes of reversing the species’s threat of extinction. Donate to the Port Macquarie Koala Hospital’s GoFundMe page here.

Donate to the RSPCA of New South Wales

The RSPCA of New South Wales is working to evacuate, rescue and treat pets, livestock and wildlife in impacted areas. Make a donation to the RSPCA of New South Wales here.

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Pets and Christmas Food

A lot of the lovely food you feast on over the Christmas period can be very harmful to our faithful companions. Watch out for the following favourites that are most definitely NOT for your furry friend!

Chocolate

All kinds of chocolate and cocoa-based products – including chocolate tree decorations and chocolate advent calendars – should be kept away from pets because chocolate contains a stimulant called theobromine. Theobromine is toxic to dogs and cats: it can lead to a racing heartbeat, dehydration, digestive upsets, seizures and in severe cases DEATH. The darker the chocolate, the more harmful it is. Make sure any presents you leave under the tree do not contain chocolate if you have a dog.

If you feel you really want your pooch to join in the Christmas fun, there is such a thing as chocolate suitable for dogs, which contains zero theobromine. It’s this or nothing for Fido.

Christmas Cake

Never share fruit cake, mince pies or Christmas pudding with your pet, no matter how much they beg, because raisins and currants are highly toxic to cats and dogs, even when cooked. Dried fruit poisoning can cause diarrhoea and vomiting and, in very serious cases, could lead to kidney failure!

Fizzy Drinks

Apart from being full of sugar or artificial sweetener – both of which are very bad for your pet – many fizzy drinks also contain caffeine, which has a similar effect to the theobromine in chocolate. Rapid breathing, restlessness and a racing heartbeat are the potential symptoms of serious caffeine poisoning.

Nuts and Crisps

Salty snacks are a festive staple, but they’re bad for your pet in many ways. Peanuts and crisps contain too much salt and fat, and macadamia nuts are highly toxic: they can cause sickness, a high temperature, tremors and heart palpitations. The effects of macadamia nut poisoning can happen very quickly, so keep all nuts well out of reach.

Sugar-free sweets and Chewing Gum

These days, the sweetener xylitol is often used to replace sugar in sweets, cakes and chewing gum. Too much xylitol has a laxative effect on humans, but the consequences for your pet are much more serious. An excess of Xylitol can spark a sudden surge of the hormone insulin which, in turn, can cause seizures, vomiting, lack of co-ordination and potential liver damage.

Cheese

Keep festive cheeseboards away from hungry pets because dogs and cats can often struggle to digest the lactose in dairy products. Too much cheese can give your pet a tummy upset.


If you think your pet has eaten something potentially poisonous during the festive season, always contact your vet immediately.

So what CAN your pet eat at Christmas… aside from his own food, that is?

Christmas Turkey

The pièce de résistance of every Christmas dinner, your furry friend can enjoy small quantities of your turkey as long as all pieces are boneless, skinless and free from gravy or other marinades which can upset your pet’s stomach.

Potatoes

A super tasty side dish, again only feed your pet potatoes in small quantities – as they are starchy – and ensure they are plain with nothing else added, such as butter and salt.

Winter Vegetables

Carrots, parsnips, green beans, courgettes, brussels sprouts, broccoli, peas, spinach and cauliflower not only make yummy Christmas dinner trimmings but all great for your pet. Make sure you rinse off any excess butter or oil before giving to your furry friend and always feed in small quantities.

Why Puppies As Christmas Gifts Are STILL A Bad Idea

Surprising your son, daughter, friend, or relative with a pet as a present may seem thoughtful, but it typically doesn’t end well for the cat, dog or other critter. Thousands of them are surrendered to animal shelters by March, some as soon as the first of the New Year simply because families or new owners weren’t prepared for the care and responsibility.

Here are a few reasons why giving pets as surprise Christmas gifts, or any kind of gift, is a bad idea. We posted this information already, but here we are again because we cannot stress this enough!

Pets and Pet Owners need a Relationship

It’s pretty well known or accepted that the bond between pet and pet owner needs to be very strong and present right from the beginning. You can’t go out and pick just any dog or cat.

It is also tough to build that relationship during such a busy time of year. The surprise pet is already stressed at having been moved, of being introduced to a totally new environment from the pet store or family or shelter that he’s been used to, and really needs a quiet, calm environment. This quieter, calmer time is also necessary for pets and pet owners to establish a routine. With the chaos surrounding the whole holiday season, pets are often neglected.

Plus kids can be unreliable; kids change quickly. You know this! The puppy melts their hearts for a few days or weeks only. But then it needs to be walked every day (in the rain). It needs careful attention to its feeding and eliminating if it’s going to be housebroken effectively. It needs to be taught not to jump on people. The kids oohing and aahing under the tree will very soon move on to Snapchat or texting their friends and ignoring the poor wee creature…

 

Pets Require Time, Money and Responsibility

Pets should not be surprise gifts because, particularly for new pet owners, some families are completely unprepared and overwhelmed by the care and expense that a new pet requires. Puppies and kittens especially, but adult dogs, too.

Typically, the larger the dog, the larger the expense for vet care and dog food and the bigger the clean-up both in-house and outside.

Everything that the animal needs to be properly cared for should be discussed and planned well in advance, including the kind and size of dog that best suits families’ individual home situations. Preparation includes realizing how decorations, foods and business at Christmas time can be frightening to animals.

Many parents don’t consider that 2 weeks later the kids are back to school and the puppy still needs walks and plenty of attention (or else it starts chewing things – all sorts of things!). Realistically, it will be YOU looking after this creature, if you think it will be looked after by the children once Christmas is over, you are fooling yourself… and remember, a dog can live for a good 15 years… that’s 15 years of walking in the rain, ice, snow – picking up doggy poo – weather you want to or not, while your kids are away to college!!

Pet-friendly Alternatives

One alternative is to buy the pet supplies for Christmas and leave choosing the puppy or kitten or whatever, until after things have settled down. If they still want a puppy come the new year, and are willing to take responsibility for it, then maybe it is something that could happen for their birthday.

Why Puppies As Christmas Gifts Are A Bad Idea

Surprising your son, daughter, friend, or relative with a pet as a present may seem thoughtful, but it typically doesn’t end well for the cat, dog or other critter. Thousands of them are surrendered to animal shelters by March, some as soon as the first of the New Year simply because families or new owners weren’t prepared for the care and responsibility.

Here are a few reasons why giving pets as surprise Christmas gifts, or any kind of gift, is a bad idea.

Pets and Pet Owners need a Relationship

It’s pretty well known or accepted that the bond between pet and pet owner needs to be very strong and present right from the beginning. You can’t go out and pick just any dog or cat.

It is also tough to build that relationship during such a busy time of year. The surprise pet is already stressed at having been moved, of being introduced to a totally new environment from the pet store or family or shelter that he’s been used to, and really needs a quiet, calm environment. This quieter, calmer time is also necessary for pets and pet owners to establish a routine. With the chaos surrounding the whole holiday season, pets are often neglected.

Plus kids can be unreliable; kids change quickly. You know this! The puppy melts their hearts for a few days or weeks only. But then it needs to be walked every day (in the rain… we live in Ireland, remember?!). It needs careful attention to its feeding and eliminating if it’s going to be housebroken effectively. It needs to be taught not to jump on people. The kids oohing and aahing under the tree will very soon move on to Snapchat and texting their friends and ignoring the poor wee creature….

Pets Require Time, Money and Responsibility

Pets should not be surprise gifts because, particularly for new pet owners, some families are completely unprepared and overwhelmed by the care and expense that a new pet requires. Puppies and kittens especially, but adult dogs, too.

Typically, the larger the dog, the larger the expense for vet care and dog food and the bigger the clean-up both in-house and outside.

Everything that the animal needs to be properly cared for should be discussed and planned well in advance, including the kind and size of dog that best suits families’ individual home situations. Preparation includes realizing how decorations, foods and business at Christmas time can be frightening to animals.

Many parents don’t consider that 2 weeks later the kids are back to school and the puppy still needs walks and plenty of attention (or else it starts chewing things – all sorts of things!). Realistically, it will be YOU looking after this creature, if you think it will be looked after by the children once Christmas is over, you are fooling yourself.

Pet-friendly Alternatives

One alternative is to buy the pet supplies for Christmas and leave choosing the puppy or kitten or whatever, until after things have settled down. If they still want a puppy come the new year, and are willing to take responsibility for it, then maybe it is something that could happen for their birthday.

Artists for Animals

We are delighted to be hosting a great night of music to raise much needed funds to help animals in our care, on Friday 15th November at 8pm in The Lisdoo, Newry Road, Dundalk.

It’s a night not to be missed with three amazing musical performances from Zoe Conway & John McIntyre, Jim Corr & Liam Monagher and the Oriel Traditional Orchestra. MC on the night is Dundalk personality Mr Harry Lee.

There will be a raffle with lots of great prizes. Finger food will be provided. For those with a pep in your step, DJ Karl Collins from Dundalk FM will provide tunes till late!

Tickets are €20 available from

  • Avenue Vets
  • The Pet Centre, Linenhall St
  • Prize Pets, Riverlane, Dundalk

Also available at the door on the night. Doors open at 7.30pm.

Kittens!

Here are three wee kitty’s in need of homes. We have 5 in one with one fosterer, three with another, so anyone looking for kittens look no further as we have loads to rehome.

There is also older cats as in up to a year old in Avenue Road Vets looking for their forever home too. Please get in touch if interested.

Apply For Homing

Day-time contact number.
An email we can reach you at. Does not have to yours, but you need access to it.
Type the name of the animal from the above description.
Please help us out by describing where you live, family members, and why you feel your home will be ideal. We WILL carry out a home inspection if you are chosen.
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What should I do before adopting an animal?

Any existing pets and your new arrival should be vaccinated for rabies, distemper, parvo, and other common diseases, as recommended by your vet. The bordatella (kennel cough) vaccine may also be recommended for dogs. There is a good chance that your new pet could be harboring a disease, and it isn’t wise to unnecessarily risk your other pets’ health. It would be ideal to keep incoming animals separate from your own pets for a period of time if you have the space to do so (and this is a must if you are introducing a dog that haven’t been fully vetted), but this isn’t always realistic since the animal will be living in your home as a member of the family.

In the case of dogs, make sure you have a well-fitted collar and ID tag. Remember that this dog doesn’t know you yet and might get spooked and run. Take all possible precautions. Better safe than sorry!

You will have to treat the new arrival like a puppy (or kitten!) at first. Puppy proof the house before he arrives. If he is young or has not been raised in a house, he might be destructive and not housetrained. You should set up a crate for him with bedding that can be easily cleaned or thrown away if soiled or chewed (like old towels).

If you choose not to use a crate, you should have a small, pet-safe room (like a laundry room) for when you cannot watch them. If you use an outdoor kennel for unsupervised time, make sure it is very secure (a cover or top is recommended) and be sure to provide appropriate shelter, shade, bedding, and clean water. Please also remember that cats like to be outside more than inside.

Dogs and Fireworks

Adults and children alike look forward to the fireworks at Hallowe’en, New Year’s Eve and other occasions – but we sometimes forget that a lot of animals suffer terrible anxiety as a result of loud noise and flashing lights. You should keep your cat indoors if at all possible, but it is dogs who suffer the most around fireworks.

Some dogs have no problem with the sight and sound of fireworks if they’ve been desensitized — hunting dogs, for example, grow used to the sounds and smells of hunting rifles and gun powder. Most dogs, however, are not used to these things, so fireworks can be particularly stressful for them.

For example, more pets (dogs and cats) run away on Hallowe’en than any other day, so you should take extra steps to ensure their safety. Keep a keen eye on your pets during the commotion, and make sure your they are wearing proper identification.

You should arrange to have your dog in a place where there won’t be loud fireworks displays — a friend’s or relative’s home (ideally out of town) or a doggie day care with which your dog is familiar. If it’s an unfamiliar place for your dog, take him over there a few times in the days before the holiday so that it won’t be a surprise when you take him there before fireworks start firing off.

If you are going to be with your dog during the fireworks, sending the calming message that they are nothing to worry about will also help him to relax. Remember, though, while humans communicate with words, dogs communicate with energy, and will look to their pack leader for clues on how they should behave. If you’re not making a big deal or showing excitement about the fireworks, then he will learn to be less concerned as well.

In all cases above, expend your dog’s excess energy first, before the fireworks start, by taking her on a very long walk to tire her out and put her in a calm state.

Consider purchasing an anxiety wrap (“thundershirt” in US) to keep your dog calm. They’ve been widely reported to work quite well at keeping dogs calm during fireworks.

dog-anxiety-vest-wrap

Most importantly, don’t think of this in terms of your dog as your child who is missing out on a great, fun time. That’s human guilt. Your dog won’t know what she’s missing. You’re being a good pack leader by not exposing her to a situation that will trigger her flight instinct in a negative way. When the booms and bangs are over, your dog will be grateful to you for having made it a less stressful experience!

7-3-15-fireworks-color